Solidarity: Safety, Justice, Wellbeing

“Collaboration is vital to sustain what we call profound or really deep change, because without it, organisations are just overwhelmed by the forces of the status quo.”  Peter Senge

We know women and children experiencing domestic and family violence and sexual violence benefit when services are integrated across sectors. This is especially true for women in rural and regional areas, women with disability, women from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, who all face additional barriers to accessing services.

About the program

By combining practice wisdom and research evidence, the Safety, Justice, Wellbeing series will create the space for practitioners to build on existing work and imagine new possibilities for collective, integrated and collaborative work. Whether you are already part of a collaborative process, or would like to be, this series will help you achieve your goals.

Following on from last year’s popular Daring, Inclusive, Feminist Leadership series, this series will provide opportunities for you to participate at a level that meets your needs and capacity. Symposiums, delivered across 2022 will inspire your thinking and build your connections across the sector and beyond. You can also choose to opt into a program of peer groups session which will build on the content delivered in the symposiums and may lead to further action learning opportunities, supported by WorkUP Queensland.

This is a flexible program that includes two core components:

  1. Symposiums: Covering three main topic areas, Safety, Justice and Wellbeing, the symposiums will consist of a keynote and then a panel discussion. Panel discussions will include a practitioner, an academic and case study relevant to the topic.
  2. Facilitated peer learning groups: Delving deeply into the themes of Safety, Wellbeing and Justice, peer groups can consist of members from within one organisation or be cross-sectoral.

To get the best out of this program we encourage people to engage in both components. We recognise the constraints of the sector and to support flexibility people may choose to attend the symposiums only. The peer learning groups will scaffold learning from the symposiums, so it is essential to also participate in the three symposiums if you wish to join the peer learning groups.

Join Jan Archer (Archersfield Consulting and Management) and a raft of inspirational speakers from practice and academia as we explore what Safety, Justice and Wellbeing mean for the people we work with, and for the workforce.

Listen to the podcast below for more information about the series:

Event Information

Symposiums – attend them all or just the ones of interest to you

  • Symposium 1: Safety – 30 March 2022 (Online)
  • Symposium 2: Justice – 8 June 2022 (Seminar Rooms 3 & 4, Caboolture Hub, 4 Hasking St, Caboolture QLD 4510)
  • Symposium 3: Wellbeing – 14 September 2022 (Location TBA)

Time: 9:30am – 1:30pm AEST (All symposiums)

Peer Learning Groups

Please note you must register for all three symposiums to register for the peer learning groups. The facilitator will be in touch to develop a date schedule for the year. It is anticipated that each peer learning group will meet a maximum of 6 times during the year (April, May, July, August, October and November).

Download our flyer and share with your networks.

Register

For more information about this event and to register please visit: https://events.humanitix.com/solidarity-safety-justice-wellbeing

Jan Archer (Archersfield Consulting and Management)

Before leaving the Public Service Jan Archer was the Deputy Commissioner for Fair Trading in Queensland.  

Jan’s experience includes significant change leadership responsibilities in local government amalgamations; leadership in the establishment and dis-establishment of government agencies and the creation of new shared service models and integrated corporate service delivery across government departments. 

Much of Jan’s work in the university, public and community sectors has focused on innovation, reform and how leaders of public, private and community organisations can engage in adding value to their enterprises. Upon leaving the public service, Jan established Archersfield Consulting and Management, which has delivered change leadership support across sectors in QLD, NSW, NT and the ACT for 14 years. 

Wynetta Dewis (CEO, Queensland Indigenous Family Violence Legal Service)

Wynetta is a proud Torres Strait Islander woman and the Chief Executive of Queensland Indigenous Family Violence Legal Service, a role she has held since early 2019. She has many years’ experience working in community development and corporate services. Wynetta is the Chair of the National Family Violence Prevention Legal Services Forum, Chair of Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Domestic and Family Violence Prevention Group and a member on the Board of Community Legal Services Australia.

Aimee McVeigh (CEO, Queensland Council of Social Service)

Aimee is QCOSS’ Chief Executive Officer, and a strong advocate for equality, opportunity and wellbeing for all Queenslanders.

As a community lawyer and human rights advocate, Aimee led the successful campaign for a Human Rights Act for Queensland. Her work as a lawyer focussed on human rights and discrimination, guardianship, estate planning, child protection and domestic violence.

Prior to joining QCOSS, she worked in various senior and advisory roles, including at the Disability Royal Commission, Disability Law Queensland and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Legal and Advocacy Service.

Aimee has been engaged by the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples as a gender advisor, and has worked with a number of non-profit organisations in Queensland, including during the Child Abuse Royal Commission.

Susan Beattie (Manager, Domestic and Family Violence Death Review Unit, Qld Coroners Court)

Ms Susan Beattie is the Manager of the Domestic and Family Violence Death Review Unit in the Coroners Court of Queensland. Ms Beattie has worked in a variety of senior policy, research and project management roles within the public sector and in non-government organisations focusing on driving service improvement and reform. This includes initiatives that seek to reduce alcohol and other drug related harms, prevent and reduce suicides, and improve responses to children known to child safety services.

Most recently, Ms Beattie led the expansion of the systemic domestic and family violence death review process in the Coroners Court of Queensland and was responsible for coordinating cross-agency improvements to the coronial system. Ms Beattie is also an Independent Decision Maker under the National Redress Scheme for people who have experienced institutional child sexual abuse and holds a Masters in Forensic Mental Health and Bachelor of Behavioural Sciences (Psychology).

Tracy Linford (Queensland Police Service)

Tracy Linford joined the Queensland Police Service in 2015.  She currently holds executive responsibility for the Crime, Counter Terrorism and Specialist Operations portfolio. Tracy has over 37 years’ policing experience in both Victoria and Queensland.  During her 31 years in Victoria Police, she worked on state-wide projects that have impacted significantly the way Victoria Police operates today. Tracy performs key governance roles on Boards and Committees including the QPS Board of Management. She is member of the Domestic and Family Violence Prevention Council and is currently a member of the Women’s Safety and Justice Taskforce.  She chairs the Senior Women’s Collective, is a representative on the Australia-New Zealand Counter-Terrorism Committee, Australian Centre to Counter Child Exploitation, Australian Transnational, Serious and Organised Crime Committee, and the National Criminal Intelligence System Committee. Tracy also represents the QPS on several other intergovernmental committees.

Karina Hogan (Broadcaster)

Karina was born in Brisbane to an Aboriginal and Southsea Islander mother and Australian father. She grew up in Logan where at a very early age she knew she wanted to work for and with her community. Since, she has worked in leadership roles and as a journalist, producer and broadcaster and done work in community engagement alongside various organisations. She spent 10 years on the management committee of Sisters Inside working alongside women impacted by the criminal justice system,  and spent six years as the Chair of The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service (ATSICHS). She was appointed to the board of the Children’s Hospital Queensland in 2019. In 2019 Karina took up the challenge of helping to create and develop a documentary centred on incarceration in Australia. ‘Incarceration Nation’ was shortlisted for the 2022 Walkley awards and through this Karina remains part of the subsequent campaign advocating for those impacted by the criminal justice system. She continues to advocate for positive and sustainable change in her community, particularly in the health, media and justice space.

Amy Remeikis (Guardian News & Media)

Amy Remeikis is a political reporter with The Guardian, and currently helms the popular Politics Live Blog.  She is a regular contributor to The Project, The Drum and Insiders, as well as ABC radio RN and is the author of the best selling ‘On Reckoning’.

Professor Cathy Humphreys (University of Melbourne)

Cathy Humphreys is Professor of Social Work at University of Melbourne.  She is co-chair of the Melbourne research Alliance to End Violence Against Women and Their Children (MAEVe). She specialises in applied research. Four projects in the past 5 years have worked with the Safe & Together Institute using practice-led, action research through facilitated multi-stakeholder workshops and Communities of Practice. This approach reflects a profound interest in knowledge translation to ensure the support of practice through research. Her research focuses on DFV and child abuse and child sexual exploitation. She has a long-term interest in the intersection of DFV with other complexities including mental health and AOD. Professor Humphreys is a well published author of more than 130 journal articles. She worked at the University of Warwick for 12 years leading a domestic violence and child abuse research centre before returning to Australia in 2006. For 15 years she worked as a social worker.   

Professor Sandra Creamer (CEO, National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Alliance)

Sandra Creamer is the CEO of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Alliance, a lawyer and Adjunct Professor of Public Health at the University of Queensland. She is a Wannyi/Kalkadoon. Sandra has worked with Indigenous women in Australia and globally, and believes it is important to empower Indigenous women for self-determination, equality of their rights, and understanding how they can challenge issues that affect their communities and work with them to find solutions. Sandra was awarded an AM in 2019 for her service to Indigenous women. 

Paul Monsour (Anglicare and SPEAQ)

Paul works as a counsellor, group facilitator and team leader of a men’s domestic violence behaviour change program for Anglicare in Brisbane, a position he has held for 18 years. He has been Secretary and coordinator of the SPEAQ network (Services and Practitioners for the Elimination of Abuse Qld) since 2007 and has been a member of a number of reference groups within the DFV sector. Paul has been the principal author of a number of submissions to government around DFV service system reform. Apart from that, he has a passion for good practice, genuine engagement and collaboration, and developing a deep understanding of the human condition.

Karina Hogan (Broadcaster)

Karina was born in Brisbane to an Aboriginal and Southsea Islander mother and Australian father. She grew up in Logan where at a very early age she knew she wanted to work for and with her community. Since, she has worked in leadership roles and as a journalist, producer and broadcaster and done work in community engagement alongside various organisations. She spent 10 years on the management committee of Sisters Inside working alongside women impacted by the criminal justice system,  and spent six years as the Chair of The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service (ATSICHS). She was appointed to the board of the Children’s Hospital Queensland in 2019. In 2019 Karina took up the challenge of helping to create and develop a documentary centred on incarceration in Australia. ‘Incarceration Nation’ was shortlisted for the 2022 Walkley awards and through this Karina remains part of the subsequent campaign advocating for those impacted by the criminal justice system. She continues to advocate for positive and sustainable change in her community, particularly in the health, media and justice space.

Video Recording

Solidarity: Safety, Justice, Wellbeing – Symposium 1 (Safety)

This is the first Symposium of the Solidarity: Safety, Justice, Wellbeing series held on 30 March 2022.

Video Recording

Amy Remeikis, Guardian News & Media

Keynote presentation

Video Recording

Professor Cathy Humphreys, University of Melbourne

Domestic and Family Violence Service Navigation

Video Recording

Karina Hogan, Broadcaster

Personal resilience story

Video Recording

Paul Monsour, Anglicare and SPEAQ

Perspectives on Safety from Men’s DFV behaviour change work and the SPEAQ network

Video Recording

Professor Sandra Creamer, CEO, National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Alliance

Case Study

Presentation Slides

Professor Cathy Humphreys, University of Melbourne

Domestic and Family Violence Service Navigation

Presentation Slides

Paul Monsour, Anglicare and SPEAQ

Perspectives on Safety from Men’s DFV behaviour change work and the SPEAQ network

Questions?

Please contact Theresa on 0424 979 454 for questions about the program. For questions or support with bookings please contact Annika at workforce@healingfoundation.org.au or 0438 589 420.