Action Learning for Inclusion with Daile Kelleher, CEO at Children by Choice

Action Learning for Inclusion with Daile Kelleher, CEO at Children by Choice

Recently WorkUP Queensland had the opportunity to speak to Daile Kelleher, Chief Executive Officer at Children by Choice. Below are some highlights from our yarn about her involvement in the ongoing Action Learning for Inclusion process.

WorkUP Queensland: What drew your interest to take part in the action learning process?

Daile: Two of our staff attended the ‘Same, Same but Different’ forums on inclusion and thought it was a process that was an incredibly valuable opportunity for learning. We saw that it needed to be taken seriously by leadership. I made the decision to come on board. It’s a commitment as an organisation, it’s a long-term thing.

WorkUP Queensland: Tell us about the project you will be working on as part of the action learning process.

Daile: We are doing our Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP). We had talked about this as important and realised it takes resources and time. We wondered how we do it in the best possible way and with a small workforce. We’ve already formed an internal working group and talked to the management committee about their involvement and commitment. The next few months will be about reflecting on what we do currently. We want to have the foundations down for a draft RAP… to consider submitting to Reconciliation Queensland.

WorkUP Queensland: Describe how your service will look when you have paved the way for greater inclusivity?

Daile: For us it’s about the resources, education, access and awareness raising. We are the only ‘all options pregnancy service’ – in this way we are unique. All our outwards-facing resources need to be culturally safe and supportive.

WorkUP Queensland: How do you plan to celebrate the success of your project?

Daile: Weaving it into what we do would be a success. Celebrating the formative stages of moving forward but also making it part of core business and embedding this way of working.

 

Thank you to all those involved in our action learning – we hope to continue sharing their stories.


Join us this Children’s Week

Join us this Children’s Week

Children’s week is held annually on the fourth Wednesday of October. The Children’s Week Council of Australia strongly advocates for and promotes the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC). The theme this year is based around article 15 which states:

‘Children have the right to meet with other children and young people and to join groups and organisations, as long as this does not stop other people from enjoying their rights.’

In total there are 54 articles in the Convention. One of the most basic human rights principles is the right to live free from the threat of violence. Article 19 of the UNCRC articulates this right for every child and obliges States Parties to take appropriate measures to protect the child from all forms of violence.

In recognition of the rights of the child and to support their safety, WorkUP Queensland is hosting an upcoming series, Supporting Safety: Children and young people in the gendered violence context in collaboration with Queensland Centre for Domestic and Family Violence Research. You can register for these workshops here.

Being familiar with the UNCRC can support our work within the revised practice standards for the domestic and family violence sector. The revised practice standards are informed by theoretical frameworks of social justice, where we seek better outcomes for victims of violence, including children, and human rights approaches that encourage the knowing and claiming of rights.


We're hiring

Project Officer – WorkUP Queensland

The Healing Foundation is seeking a part-time Project Officer for WorkUP Queensland.

This position in Reporting and Events contributes to achieving the outcomes and objectives of WorkUP Queensland by working collaboratively with the domestic and family violence, sexual violence and women’s health and wellbeing sector to provide Queenslanders with a strategic, well-trained and strongly supported workforce that will help in the fight to end violence.

Role and responsibilities:

  • prepares timely reporting on WorkUP Queensland engagement and delivery to effectively communicate performance and impact for stakeholders, governance bodies and contract managers
  • collaborates with WorkUP Queensland team members to provide event management for the delivery of a suite of state-wide capacity and capability-building strategies both directly and through sub-contractors
  • supports the development and ongoing maintenance of databases and event management systems to support reporting and delivery of WorkUP Queensland
  • collaborates with other Healing Foundation staff and contractors to ensure effective delivery and integration of knowledge
  • establishes and maintains strong, effective and culturally appropriate relationships with project stakeholders
  • complies with Healing Foundation policies on trauma and healing and ensures open communication on trauma and healing issues with staff
  • identifies and raises project resource issues with Healing Foundation management in a constructive and solutions-focused manner
  • supports the implementation of team goals, works collaboratively and builds effective relationships with other members of the team and seeks ongoing support from their supervisors and other team members.

To apply for this role, please email hr@healingfoundation.org.au by 14 October 2020 with your resume and a short (maximum 2 page) summary explaining why you are the best person for the role.

Click here to download the position description, including essential criteria.


Don’t forget to ask yourself: Are you okay?

With R U OK day today, we thought it was timely to share what we have learnt…

Trent Savill is a consultant therapist and the Director of Complex Care. Trent has delivered a range of workshops for WorkUP Queensland including self-care, working with children and adjusting to COVID-19. We asked Trent to share some reflections and top five tips from the wellbeing and COVID-19 workshops. 

Working in the domestic and family violence sector exposes professionals to a whole range of stressors, potentially on a daily basis and it’s important for ourselves and for our clients that we take care of ourselves. Additionally, COVID-19 has brought a whole range of new stressors for our clients and for us as practitioners. Cumulative exposure to crisis, risk, and trauma can start to impact on our mental health, slowly shifting us towards higher levels of physiological arousal.

The greatest challenge is continuing to invest in self-care and wellbeing strategies, even when we are time-poor or under increased stress. Here are some tips to embed self-care into our daily lives.

Creating routines, rules or rituals – can help change habits.

  1. Sleep: For healthy functioning, our brain needs to get 8 hours of solid sleep on a regular basis, as it is towards the end of our sleep cycle that we have the most REM sleep. Creating rules around bed-time, such as no technology in bed, can break habits that contribute to poor sleep. Making rules around caffeine intake, such as not drinking coffee after 12pm can also support this. Even building a routine around going to bed one night a week can go a long way in maintaining your mental health.
  2. Exercise: Find exercise that you enjoy and plan it into your week. Research shows that exercising for 30 minutes per day at vigorous intensity can completely burn off excess cortisol from our body, that we would otherwise be carrying in our system for 2-3 days. It also releases calming hormones and neurotransmitters, improving mood and promoting positive emotions. Exercising with a friend has the added bonus of keeping you connected.
  3. Diet: We all know about the benefits of a healthy diet for our body’s physical wellbeing, but we often don’t consider its impact on our mental health and mood. 95% of our Serotonin  (feel good happiness chemical) is actually produced by the micro-flora in the lining of our gut. Try to avoid eating too much processed foods, particularly foods high in sugar, sodium and fat. Eating fresh fruit and vegetables rich in vitamins, and foods with anti-inflammatory properties like turmeric, ginger and garlic, are associated with promoting brain health and positive mood.
  4. Mindfully monitoring: Working in this sector can place us at higher risk of compassion fatigue, vicarious trauma and emotional constriction. Some people may notice that they are holding the emotions of others in their body, or that they leave their feelings at the door when they step into a session or pick up the phone. We want to resonate with our clients’ experiences so they feel genuinely connected and not alone in those big feelings. There are also times where we need to step back to provide containment and hold a space for them and ourselves. This process of actively attempting to not feel, in many ways, goes against the connections of our brain and nervous system, and repetitive attempts to step away from what we are experiencing can start to lead us towards feeling increasingly numb.If you are frequently having moments where you need to leave your feelings at the door, make sure you have strategies for picking them back up on the way out. This could mean setting up daily prompts on your phone that cue you to pause, take a deep breath and notice what you are feeling Mindfulness apps allow you to program these prompts into your day so that you can engage in calming and centring activity that reconnects you with your emotions.
  5. Transition rituals: Planning transition rituals, that signal the end of your work-day and support you to leave it behind, can be really important to maintaining our self-care and relationships with others. This may involve taking some time on your commute home to reflect and process the day, and then playing a particular song to symbolise your decision to leave that stress until tomorrow. If working from home, it may be that you take your dog for a walk to decompress or have a shower and change your clothes to symbolise that transition.

This content is an excerpt from a longer piece written in the context of COVID 19 response, click here to read the full article. 

Authored by Trent Savill, Complex Care after WorkUP Queensland Professional Development events
(held on 19 April and 11 May 2020) 


Save the Date! SPARK webinar #3 Examining Whiteness and Racism 30 September, 12pm

Save the Date! SPARK webinar #3 Examining Whiteness and Racism
30 September, 12pm

The global Black Lives Matter demonstrations have uncovered some unsettling, raw and painful truths in Australia. For Aboriginal people and people of colour, this moment is part of a centuries-old fight against colonisation, white privilege and institutionalised racism.

Dr Tracy Castelino will deliver this SPARK webinar drawing on her 20 years of experience working to challenge and eliminate racism. She will explore how white ways of relating, of speaking intentions of solidarity, whilst important, reinforce the status quo: institutionalised whiteness.

This SPARK webinar offers the opportunity to explore the critical issues of responding to racism and institutionalised white privilege. Tracy will focus on naming the politics of whiteness, highlighting the benefits and unintentional pitfalls of solidarity and anti-racist work, and how we can use this moment to disrupt the way racism systematically destroys our relations with each other and ourselves.  Participants will also have the opportunity to reflect on what this means for themselves and their practice.

We invite you to join us to explore how we can use this moment in time to disrupt racism and step in to find new ways to relate to ourselves and to each other.


Advanced Leadership - leading complex systems starting on 13 October 2020

Advanced Leadership - leading complex systems starting on 13 October 2020

Only five places left - please register soon!

Building on from the recently held Growing in leadership series for emerging leaders, we are excited to be offering an important peer learning opportunity specifically designed for experienced leaders, managers and executive leaders across sexual violence, women’s health and wellbeing and domestic and family violence services.

This virtual workshop series will unpack and hone advanced leadership skills, attributes and behaviours that support the complex nature of executive leadership. Prepare for a collective deep dive into tricky and complex issues!
This two part series will be presented and facilitated by Gabrielle Borggaard Nicholson from Inner Vision Consulting. Gabrielle recently stepped out of a decade long CEO role to pursue her passion to support NGO’s, departments, leaders and practitioners to realise their vision. For more information go to: https://workupqld.org.au/whats-on/


Updated Q&A's for Panel of providers

Panel of providers

WorkUP Queensland is commencing a Standing Offer Arrangement (SOA) to establish a panel of providers to deliver professional development services for the domestic and family violence, sexual assault and women’s health and wellbeing sector.

The procurement process has been developed with independent advice for the purpose of ensuring accountability, transparency, and equity and with a view to identifying what alternative’s and options are available to support the sector in the provision of professional development services.

Establishing a panel will enable WorkUP Queensland to draw upon experts that provides the sector with professional development that is:

  • highly engaging and relevant to the contemporary environment content
  • designed to support sector collaboration
  • agile and timely
  • delivered by acknowledged experts
  • high-quality
  • value for money
  • responsive to sector needs
  • locally available
  • flexible and delivered through a range of channels
  • delivered in line with WorkUP Queensland’s learning principles

If you know of professional development providers who reflect the above please feel free to send them this link for the Standing Offer Arrangement, or invite them to contact us by email workforce@healingfoundation.org.au

For more information, please read the Q&A sheet.

We have received some feedback in regards to opening and saving the document using various different browsers. To ensure no work is lost, we recommend you follow these steps:

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Panel of providers - updated Q&A's

Panel of providers

WorkUP Queensland is commencing a Standing Offer Arrangement (SOA) to establish a panel of providers to deliver professional development services for the domestic and family violence, sexual assault and women’s health and wellbeing sector.

The procurement process has been developed with independent advice for the purpose of ensuring accountability, transparency, and equity and with a view to identifying what alternative’s and options are available to support the sector in the provision of professional development services.

Establishing a panel will enable WorkUP Queensland to draw upon experts that provides the sector with professional development that is:

  • highly engaging and relevant to the contemporary environment content
  • designed to support sector collaboration
  • agile and timely
  • delivered by acknowledged experts
  • high-quality
  • value for money
  • responsive to sector needs
  • locally available
  • flexible and delivered through a range of channels
  • delivered in line with WorkUP Queensland’s learning principles

If you know of professional development providers who reflect the above please feel free to send them this link for the Standing Offer Arrangement, or invite them to contact us by email workforce@healingfoundation.org.au

For more information, please read the Q&A sheet.

 


Peer mentoring – your own safety container

Our professional lives can seem to be constantly under the pump from needing to move forward and to constantly grow and learn. Whilst professional learning and growth is important, it’s also important to stop, pay attention and be aware of what is happening for us, how we are responding and what is driving that response. Only then can we know we are moving forward in the right direction. And sometimes it’s not about moving forward, it’s about staying still and taking a moment to breathe.

For many of us, doing this alone through journaling or meditation is challenging. Particularly so, when so many of our day to day decisions about our work are made alone.  Peer mentoring can feel like a soothing and comforting balm. Peer mentoring is when two or more people who share similar contexts, life experiences and challenges agree to connect for the purposes of mutual support. Not to give advice, not to judge and not to ‘stretch’ each other. Rather, to listen, to empathise, to share stories and together to create a safe container to hold the challenging stuff that is happening in your lives.

Connecting Across the Land is a peer mentoring program.  It has been designed to promote a culture of care within the sexual violence, women’s health and wellbeing and domestic and family violence sector which is a key priority of the Central and South West Queensland workforce plans.  It is a flexible program that will be iteratively tailored to meet the needs of participants to ensure that the connections that develop are authentic and last way beyond the semi-structured phase of the program.

You can register for Connecting Across the Land now at https://workupqld.org.au/whats-on/

to register for the information session or the whole program.

Contact Christine at WorkUP Queensland for more information:

christine@healingfoundation.org.au

0400 999 184

We would love to have you... You don’t have to fly solo!


Safe to stretch

When it comes to establishing creative and innovative workplaces ensuring a safe space is vital. When people feel that they are respected, valued and have the opportunity and resources to contribute their talents and perspectives everyone benefits through increased creativity, innovation and productivity.

“When we speak, listen and think well together there's greater productivity,” says Jan. “When we're psychologically safe to challenge ourselves that's where creativity, innovation and collaboration happens.”
A safe space though doesn’t mean a space for avoiding disagreements. “It’s about ensuring people feel safe to bring their whole self to whatever it is that they're doing.”

If teams are to learn together, they must be able to ‘think together’ which requires that they develop the disciplines of dialogue and discussion. In productive, creative and meaningful conversations team members must suspend assumptions, listen, speak openly, share meaning and allow new insights to develop in the process of thinking together about complex issues.

Jan Ungerer has worked with countless individuals, teams and organisations to develop meaningful change. Jan is presenting two upcoming workshops ‘Safe to Stretch’ and ‘Ideas to Action’ for WorkUP Qld throughout August and September. Jan shares some insights about these upcoming workshops that have a focus on developing team cultures that enable creativity and innovation.

Jan is looking forward to equipping participants with knowledge, confidence and strategies for creating a culture where everyone is expected and encouraged to create and innovate, bringing the best ideas to life.

You can find out more about Jan and her work at www.insightfulcommunications.com.au.

You can register and find out more here 

Contact Christine at WorkUP Queensland on 0400 999 184 or email christine@healingfoundation for more information.